Wednesday, February 12, 2014

ITWS and CS Colloquium - Simson Garfinkel Talk Rescheduled for February 21st, 2014 at 3:30 PM in DCC 337

JOINT COLLOQUIUM
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND WEB SCIENCE (ITWS)
AND COMPUTER SCIENCE (CSCI)

Prof. Simson L. Garfinkel
Naval Postgraduate School
Arlington, Virginia

Digital Forensics Innovation: Searching A Terabyte of Data in 10 minutes

Most digital forensics tools follow a simple model of “visibility, filter and report” – the tool extracts all of the information on a subject’s disk drive, this information is filtered according to search terms, and finally a detailed report is created by a trained examiner. The problem with this model is that it cannot keep up with the growing amount of storage on desktops and in the cloud, the increasing diversity of data formats, or the growing perniciousness of malware.

This talk presents a new approach that allows rapid triage of digital storage devices using random sampling, bulk data analysis, and the presence of distinct, recognizable sectors that are commonly found in user-generated documents, multimedia, and encrypted files. It shows how a 30MB piece of video hidden on a 1TB hard drive can be found in less than 10 minutes, even if the video deleted and partially overwritten so that no file headers, footers, or metadata can be recovered. We show how we can deploy this technique on a laptop in the field with a custom-built database with a billion rows that can perform more than a thousand lookups per second.

Bio:    
Simson L. Garfinkel is an Associate Professor at the Naval Postgraduate School. Based in Arlington VA, Garfinkel’s research interests include computer forensics, the emerging field of usability and security, personal information management, privacy, information policy and terrorism. He holds six US patents for his computer-related research and has published dozens of journal and conference papers in security an
computer forensics.

Garfinkel is the author or co-author of fourteen books on computing. He is perhaps best known for his book Database Nation: The Death of Privacy in the 21st Century. Garfinkel’s most successful book, Practical UNIX and Internet Security (co-authored with Gene Spafford), has sold more than 250,000 copies and been translated into more than a dozen languages since the first edition was published in 1991.

Garfinkel is also a journalist and has written more than a thousand articles about science, technology, and technology policy in the popular press since 1983. He started writing about identity theft in 1988. He has won numerous national journalism awards, including the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award two years in a row for his “Machine shop” series in CSO magazine. Today he mostly writes for Technology Review Magazine and the 
technologyreview.com website.

As an entrepreneur, Garfinkel founded five companies between 1989 and 2000. Two of the most successful were Vineyard.NET, which provided Internet service on Martha’s Vineyard to more than a thousand customers from 1995 through 2005, and Sandstorm Enterprises, an early developer of commercial computer forensic tools.

Garfinkel received three Bachelor of Science degrees from MIT in 1987, a Master’s of Science in Journalism from Columbia University in 1988, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT in 2005.

Hosted by:  Prof. Peter Fox (x4862) and Prof. Jim Hendler (x4401)


Friday, February 21, 2014
DCC 337 – 3:30 p.m.
Refreshments served at 3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014

ITWS and CS Colloquium - February 5, 2014 at 3:30 pm - CII (Low) 3051


Prof. Simson Garfinkel
Naval Postgraduate School
Arlington, Virginia

  Digital Forensics Innovation: Searching A Terabyte of Data in 10 minutes

Abstract:  Most digital forensics tools follow a simple model of “visibility, filter and report” – the tool extracts all of the information on a subject’s disk drive, this information is filtered according to search terms, and finally a detailed report is created by a trained examiner. The problem with this model is that it cannot keep up with the growing amount of storage on desktops and in the cloud, the increasing diversity of data formats, or the growing perniciousness of malware.

This talk presents a new approach that allows rapid triage of digital storage devices using random sampling, bulk data analysis, and the presence of distinct, recognizable sectors that are commonly found in user-generated documents, multimedia, and encrypted files. It shows how a 30MB piece of video hidden on a 1TB hard drive can be found in less than 10 minutes, even if the video deleted and partially overwritten so that no file headers, footers, or metadata can be recovered. We show how we can deploy this technique on a laptop in the field with a custom-built database with a billion rows that can perform more than a thousand lookups per second.

Bio:    Simson L. Garfinkel is an Associate Professor at the Naval Postgraduate School. Based in Arlington VA, Garfinkel’s research interests include computer forensics, the emerging field of usability and security, personal information management, privacy, information policy and terrorism. He holds six US patents for his computer-related research and has published dozens of journal and conference papers in security and computer forensics.

Garfinkel is the author or co-author of fourteen books on computing. He is perhaps best known for his book Database Nation: The Death of Privacy in the 21st Century. Garfinkel’s most successful book, Practical UNIX and Internet Security (co-authored with Gene Spafford), has sold more than 250,000 copies and been translated into more than a dozen languages since the first edition was published in 1991.

Garfinkel is also a journalist and has written more than a thousand articles about science, technology, and technology policy in the popular press since 1983. He started writing about identity theft in 1988. He has won numerous national journalism awards, including the Jesse H. Neal National Business Journalism Award two years in a row for his “Machine shop” series in CSO magazine. Today he mostly writes for Technology Review Magazine and the technologyreview.com website.

As an entrepreneur, Garfinkel founded five companies between 1989 and 2000. Two of the most successful were Vineyard.NET, which provided Internet service on Martha’s Vineyard to more than a thousand customers from 1995 through 2005, and Sandstorm Enterprises, an early developer of commercial computer forensic tools.

Garfinkel received three Bachelor of Science degrees from MIT in 1987, a Master’s of Science in Journalism from Columbia University in 1988, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT in 2005.

Hosted by:  Professors Peter Fox and Jim Hendler


Wednesday, February 5, 2014
CII (Low) 3051 – 3:30 p.m.
Refreshments served at 3:00 p.m.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Campus Career Information Session - Square

Campus Career Information Session
Friday 10/4 at 2PM
CII 3130

Would you like to have a high impact internship, coop or
post grad opportunity? Square is a fast growing
payments company looking for talented students for roles
in software engineering, hardware engineering, analytics
and design. Please join us on Friday at 2PM in CII 3130
to learn about Square and our career opportunities.


Annual ITWS Alumni Panel - October 9th, 6-8PM


Join us next Wednesday October 9th from 6-8pm in the Russell Sage Dining Hall for the annual ITWS Alumni panel. Eight alumni will be joining us, including two video conferencing in from the west coast! Companies represented include Cisco, Boeing, Becton Dickinson, Deloitte, GE, WebMD, Tunigo and Gramercy Cardiac Diagnostics Services/RepReferrals.


Thursday, September 5, 2013

ITWS Alumni Sean Austin

Sean Austin, B.S. ITWS '11, has been working with music start-up Tunigo since August 2012 as US Marketing Director. In June, Spotify acquired the start-up with the goal of rolling the music discovery curators into their own operation. Spotify will be going up against Apple, Google, Pandora and soon-to-be-announced Beats Music for the go-to global music streaming service in the coming months.

"As a Information Technology & Web Science student, I became fascinated with the acceleration of technology into all industries of society. As a passionate music lover and classically trained in piano, I wanted to merge the two loves since I was a sophomore. I worked on a start-up for several years while attending school which focused on mobile applications and had some success... outside the music domain though. A year ago, I had the opportunity to spin-off my own start-up that focused solely on music in the interactive mobile app space. The investment money had me quickly off down a development path, but also, got attention from a music producer who was involved in a burgeoning streaming service start-up. With the mission of music discovery at the forefront of this existing company, Tunigo, and my new start-up appropriately designated Descovery LLC, I made the decision to delay my development in order to work with this new, exciting company. A little over eight months after taking that plunge, Spotify determined Tunigo was a prime acquisition target. This provided insights into how acquisitions occur from the inside, how responsibilities change so quickly from start-up to large organization and how to always keep your goals aligned. As a Spotify employee now, I hope to continue this exhilarating growth path of music and technology."

Sean will be attending an event in early December as part of the Start Up Tech Valley Community Event Series. Additional details about the event are forthcoming.  
http://startuptechvalley.org/

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

IT Alumnus, Bill Wales, Publishes Research on CEO Narcissism

Bill Wales, IT Alumnus class of 2004, and former president of GNH, recently published an article entitled “In Pursuit of Greatness: CEONarcissism, Entrepreneurial Orientation, and Firm Performance Variance” in the Journal of Management Studies, as quoted on Today.com. Bill, now a professor of management at James Madison University, has been studying corporate entrepreneurship for several years and recently linked narcissistic CEOs to an increase in firm entrepreneurial behavior.

With greater narcissism, individuals tend to have increasingly inflated, commonly unrealistic, views of their own self-importance. Yet, these self-perceptions are generally fragile, and maintaining them demands continuous external self-affirmation from others. In organizational leadership roles, narcissists are therefore concerned with actions that draw attention to themselves, inspire awe and adoration among followers, and have the possibility of leaving behind an admirable legacy of achievement. The recent research of Wales and colleagues observes that narcissistic CEOs tend to lead companies which exhibit more entrepreneurial behavior—that is, companies which pursue more lofty innovation, take more significant risks, and undertake new ventures well before their competition. Their research demonstrates that when given the reigns of companies, narcissists will pursue more entrepreneurial, or high-risk, high-reward agendas as they are concerned foremost with company actions which have the greatest potential to return them positive accolades for their leadership. Highly entrepreneurial actions which ‘swing for the fences’ have greater potential to generate such buzz, adoration, and achievement. However, as not all entrepreneurial endeavors will be successful, particularly when they involve taking big gambles on pioneering innovations, companies led by narcissistic CEOs ultimately tend to experience both ‘bigger wins and bigger losses’ as they push their organizations to be more entrepreneurial in the pursuit of their own greatness.

In addition to discussing his research, Bill also reflected on his time spent at RPI, commenting that he “puts his IT degree to work almost every day” and looks fondly back at his time within the IT program—particularly time spent in courses such as data structures and algorithms, which thought key lessons about “problem solving and seeking both efficiency and elegance in any solution”.


Network with Bill at www.linkedin.com/in/billwales.

Monday, July 29, 2013

Lindsay Poirier (Merging IT and Social Science)

ITWS Alumni Lindsay Poirier (Class of 2013)  traveled to Africa to test software that used indigenous culture to teach mathematical concepts. She's pursuing her Ph.D. at Rensselaer and continuing her research on Africa, focusing on the critical issues involved with moving Africa into the Information Age.